Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://prr.hec.gov.pk/jspui/handle/123456789/1318
Title: PAKISTAN'S COTTON AND TEXTILES EXPORTS TO THE EUROPEAN UNION: COMPETITION, TRADE BARRIERS, FUTURE PROSPECTS AND OUTLOOK
Authors: SADAF, TAHIRA
Keywords: Social Sciences
Economics
Labor economics
Financial economics
Public finance
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: THE UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE PESHAWAR PAKISTAN
Abstract: The study, which primarily aimed at analyzing the European Union’s imports from Pakistan, finds that there exists a strong correlation between the EU’s total textiles and clothing imports and her imports from Pakistan. Same is true as far as the various categories of 26, 65 and 84 in textiles and clothing imports are concerned. Pakistan’s performance seems satisfactory especially in case of 26-category textiles, while the imports of 65-category and 84-category textiles need improvement. It is good for Pakistan that her rates of growth in 65 and 84 categories of textiles imports by the EU are relatively higher than the EU’s own total imports. Pakistan needs to maintain not only its present growth rates but she should also make efforts to get more shares, especially in 65 and 84 category textiles in EU market, as these two category belong to value added textiles. The study identifies 45, 217 and 94 the EU’s preferred 5-digit textile and clothing products, and reveals that eight Pakistani 5-digit 26-category products (with SITC codes 26339, 26310, 26902, 26490, 26721, 26901, 26652 and 26711) have attained positions in the EU’s first 20 preferred products list, while remaining 12 the EU’s preferred products have fallen into Pakistan’s relatively less preferred products list. In case of 217 5-digit 65-category products, only 14 Pakistani products (65843, 65841, 65842, 65221, 65847, 65234, 65133, 65243, 65851, 65232, 65242, 65184, 65892, and 65859) have got positions in the EU’s first 50 preferred products list. In case of the EU’s preferred 5-digit 84-category textiles products, only three Pakistani products (84140, 84629 and 84371) have attained positions in the EU’s first 20 preferred products list. These facts warrant attention of Pakistan’s textiles and clothing manufacturer, exporters and policy makers for improving quality for meeting the EU’s standards. The study finds that the EU has imposed different levels of tariffs based on the primary commodities, semi-processed and processed products, and these rates are enhanced along with the levels of processing of the products, and Pakistan is adversely suffering because of the stated the EU’s policy. In addition, the EU has put various countries in three different schemes of Generalised System of Preferences (GSP) namely, standard GSP arrangements, GSP + and EBA. Pakistan imports to the EU are presently facing general GSP arrangements, and is not benefiting from the other two relatively more beneficial schemes, presently available to a number of Pakistan’s competitors in textiles. Pakistan understands that her imports to the EU are subject to a number of non-tariff barriers (NTBs) including various standard procedures set under WTOs agreements in the disciplines of government procurement, services, investment, trade facilitation, trade defence, standards, intellectual property rights, competition policy, and rules of origin. From Pakistan’s point of view, if the EU goes for having FTAs with some of Pakistani viicompetitors, then Pakistan would face serious adverse effects due especially to the WTO related standard procedures. Based on findings of the study and conclusions drawn, this study forwards certain recommendations. Study finds Pakistan’s performance especially in cases of 26 and 65-category textiles satisfactory, and recommends that the imports of 84-category textiles from Pakistan to the EU should also be given priority, being the value added products. In case of the individual major categories (26, 65 & 84), the following 5-digit products, being the EU’s most preferred products, should be given priority, in particular. (a) The eight Pakistani 5-digit 26-category products (SITC codes: 26339, 26310, 26902, 26490, 26721, 26901, 26652 and 26711) have attained positions in EU’s first 20 preferred products list, while remaining 12 the EU’s preferred products (Table 4.30a) have fallen into Pakistan’s relatively less preferred products list; Pakistan should improve the quality of these products to attain better position in the EU’s 5-digit 26-category market. (b) In case of 217 5-digit 65-category products, only 14 Pakistani products (65843, 65841, 65842, 65221, 65847, 65234, 65133, 65243, 65851, 65232, 65242, 65184, 65892, and 65859) have got positions in the EU’s first 50 preferred products list; the remaining 36 the EU’s first category preferred products (Table 4.31a) should now be having attention of Pakistani stakeholders. (c) In case of the EU’s preferred 5-digit 84-category textiles products, only three Pakistani products (84140, 84629 and 84371) have attained positions in the EU’s first 20 preferred products list; the remaining 17 products (Table 4.32a) should be given attention for a greater value-added import of the EU from Pakistan. (d) Policy makers of the EU and Pakistan should take note of the fact that the EU policy of tariff escalation is discouraging value-addition textile trade from Pakistan. They should also take care of the concern that the EU has put Pakistan at disadvantage, comparing to its competitors, by putting Pakistan in the Generalised System of Preferences (standard GSP arrangements), and some of her serious competitors in more advantageous GSP + and EBA schemes. The EU’s officials and their Pakistani counterparts should also settle the problem of the existence of various non-tariff barriers (NTBs), and especially the affairs relating to the adoption of various standard procedures set under WTOs agreements in the disciplines of government procurement, trade in services, investment, trade facilitation, trade defence, products and processes quality standards, intellectual property rights, competition policy, and rules of origin. The EU should particularly be careful while going to have FTAs with some of Pakistan’s competitors as Pakistan would face serious adverse effects due especially to the non- or partial-adoption of the stated WTO related standard procedures. Pakistani stakeholders, especially the government, should take appropriate steps for an early and extensive adoption of WTO agreements and related standards and standard procedures. (e) Pakistani stakeholders (manufacturers, exporters and policy makers) would have to adopt the required and up-to-date quality standards (relating to the product, process and packing) while keeping costs under control. Government of Pakistan in particular should take arrangements for having inflation in control and making availability of inputs and resources ensured.
URI:  http://prr.hec.gov.pk/jspui/handle/123456789//1318
Appears in Collections:PhD Thesis of All Public / Private Sector Universities / DAIs.

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